Home
Fossils
History of B.C.
Fossil Localities in B.C.
Process
Paleontology
Terms & Definitions
Credits & Feedback
Site Map

Wapiti Lake

This site contains Triassic fossil fishes ranging from small minnow-sized creatures to a bergeria that is two meters long.

Albertonia

A short fish with long front fins Albertonia is a member of the Parasemionotiformes, the group of fish thought to be ancestral to modern bony fish such as salmon, perch and goldfish.

Albertonia
Albertonia.jpg

Photo courtesy of the Royal Tyrrell Museum
Albertonia
Albertonnia2.jpg

Photo courtesy of the Royal Tyrrell Museum

Boboasatrania

A deep-bodied fish with long fins and a deeply forked tail. Bobasatrania vary in size from a few centimeters to nearly a meter in length.

Bobasatrania
Bobasatrania.jpg

Photo courtesy of the Royal Tyrrell Museum

Boreosomis

Boreosomis
Boreosomis.jpg

Photo courtesy of the Royal Tyrrell Museum

Monotis

Belonging to the bivalves, a group of mollusks, monotis are creatures with a shell that has two halves that are hinged together. Monotis are one of the most commonly found bivalves.

Monotis
Monotis.jpg

Photo courtesy of the Royal Tyrrell Museum

Ichthyosaur

Ichthyosaurs are an extinct group of porpoise-like marine reptiles. Their body shape and skull structure suggests they were fast-moving predators, much like the dolphins of today. Ichthyosaurs have also recently been discovered at the Pink Mountain site.

Ichthyosaur
Ichthyosaur.jpg

Photo courtesy of the Royal Tyrrell Museum
Ichthyosaur
Ichthyosaur2.jpg

Photo courtesy of the Royal Tyrrell Museum

Paleobates

Paleobates, a form of prehistoric shark, is known mainly from teeth and the tooth-like projections on its skin.

Paleobates
Paleobates.jpg

Photo courtesy of the Royal Tyrrell Museum

Parasemoinotid

Parasemoinotid
Parasemoinotid.jpg

Photo courtesy of the Royal Tyrrell Museum

Perleidus

An early Triassic fish.

Perleidus
Perleidus.jpg

Photo courtesy of the Royal Tyrrell Museum

Saurichthys

By the shape of this saurichthys, scientists can tell that it was the type of fish that ambushed its prey. Its cylindrical body offered little resistance, and this fish was able to snap up its prey with its long and slender jaw.

Saurichthys
Saurichthys.jpg

Photo courtesy of the Royal Tyrrell Museum

Whitea

Whiteia is a coelacanth, which first appeared in the Devonian period and survives to the present. Thought to be extinct, a coelacanth was discovered alive and well, swimming off the shores of Madagascar in 1938. Whiteia is one of the most common fish at the Wapiti Lake site.

Whitea
Whitea.jpg

Photo courtesy of the Royal Tyrrell Museum

Pteronisculus
Pteronisculus
pteronisculus.jpg

Photo courtesy of the Royal British Columbia Museum
[RBCM.EH.86.1.10 b]


Watsonulus
Watsonulus
watsonulus.jpg

Photo courtesy of the Royal British Columbia Museum
[RBCM.EH.90.7.156]

  back to top